The Ties That Bind: Strong Stewardship

A plunge in small donor giving is worrying nonprofit organizations (see this recent article). While COVID giving was fairly robust, the economic impact of a near-recession seems to be causing a measurable drag on small donor donations. Are you concerned about the giving of your small donors this season?

There are many strategies to attract and retain these donors, such as offering a “set it and forget it” monthly donation option. But while small donor support is important, ensuring strong donor relationships overall will strengthen the financial health of your organization. The time is always right to beef up stewardship efforts for donors, with some tailoring based on whether they are large or small.

It doesn’t necessarily require grand gestures. Success is about making your supporters feel valued and acknowledged so they keep giving.

Here are some ideas from the Capacity Partners consultant team.

For donors, both small and large:

  • Create low-cost, high-engagement events – tours of programs or “open house” visits (depending on the nature of your mission or service delivery)
  • Hold a town hall as a state-of-the-organization/get to know us (zoom or in person) session; share compelling stories and provide lots of time for questions
  • Initiate a handwritten thank you note/phone call campaign
  • Send out a thank you mailing with a sticker or other low-cost promo/swag
  • Send out short and sweet regular update emails/newsletters. Feature a donor thank you component (perhaps once a year, list all small donors)

 

Maintaining a personal connection — and not just when a donation shows up – can make a huge difference. It can be low-budget while still making a positive impact. Be in touch all the time.

Have your board reach out to donors around holidays, with messaging that connects to the day or season (gratitude at Thanksgiving; around Valentine’s Day, send cards with related sentiments, such as “You are the heart of our organization”).

Send fun musical ecards for special occasions.

Touch base with donors periodically and consistently for no particular reason and don’t ask for anything; record good notes about their relatives, interests, and pets so that your future conversations can sincerely focus on them.

Be a connector – a resource who links people with common interests or needs – because you’ve gotten to know someone so well. Use your connections to share with other people. People appreciate it.

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For many nonprofits, in the end a significant percent of total giving comes from large donors. So be sure to keep them at the top of your priority list. Here are some tactics:

  1. Create a newsletter for “insiders” that provides insights from your leader, a special story about the impact donors have made on an individual client, or shares organization good news such as special recognition or a new partnership, that will be shared with a more general audience later.
  2. Schedule coffee visits with your top donors. Ask them if they feel comfortable with an in-person meeting or schedule a virtual coffee. The purpose is to learn why they give, which could be turned into an on-line campaign (see #4) or a profile piece in the newsletter.
  3. Single out long-term donors (designating them as Champions/Advocates or some other named distinction) at your next event with an inexpensive pin and recognition from the stage. Be sure to let this group know in advance they will be recognized.
  4. Create an on-line campaign to profile donors weekly or twice monthly. Have a quick interview on why they support the organization (and consider short videos as an option).

 

Nonprofits that don’t have a Development Director sometimes think that a donor interaction is speaking with a donor at a program or seeing someone at a program and waving to them across a room. Yes, you should note in your database all donor (and nondonor) participation in your programs.

But more importantly, seek out regular attendees and those you suspect may have special interest in your work for more personal attention when you chat about their interests in your work and what’s on tap going forward. These are the interactions that lead to larger gifts.