The Ties That Bind: Strong Stewardship

A plunge in small donor giving is worrying nonprofit organizations (see this recent article). While COVID giving was fairly robust, the economic impact of a near-recession seems to be causing a measurable drag on small donor donations. Are you concerned about the giving of your small donors this season?

There are many strategies to attract and retain these donors, such as offering a “set it and forget it” monthly donation option. But while small donor support is important, ensuring strong donor relationships overall will strengthen the financial health of your organization. The time is always right to beef up stewardship efforts for donors, with some tailoring based on whether they are large or small.

It doesn’t necessarily require grand gestures. Success is about making your supporters feel valued and acknowledged so they keep giving.

Here are some ideas from the Capacity Partners consultant team.

For donors, both small and large:

  • Create low-cost, high-engagement events – tours of programs or “open house” visits (depending on the nature of your mission or service delivery)
  • Hold a town hall as a state-of-the-organization/get to know us (zoom or in person) session; share compelling stories and provide lots of time for questions
  • Initiate a handwritten thank you note/phone call campaign
  • Send out a thank you mailing with a sticker or other low-cost promo/swag
  • Send out short and sweet regular update emails/newsletters. Feature a donor thank you component (perhaps once a year, list all small donors)

 

Maintaining a personal connection — and not just when a donation shows up – can make a huge difference. It can be low-budget while still making a positive impact. Be in touch all the time.

Have your board reach out to donors around holidays, with messaging that connects to the day or season (gratitude at Thanksgiving; around Valentine’s Day, send cards with related sentiments, such as “You are the heart of our organization”).

Send fun musical ecards for special occasions.

Touch base with donors periodically and consistently for no particular reason and don’t ask for anything; record good notes about their relatives, interests, and pets so that your future conversations can sincerely focus on them.

Be a connector – a resource who links people with common interests or needs – because you’ve gotten to know someone so well. Use your connections to share with other people. People appreciate it.

* * * *

For many nonprofits, in the end a significant percent of total giving comes from large donors. So be sure to keep them at the top of your priority list. Here are some tactics:

  1. Create a newsletter for “insiders” that provides insights from your leader, a special story about the impact donors have made on an individual client, or shares organization good news such as special recognition or a new partnership, that will be shared with a more general audience later.
  2. Schedule coffee visits with your top donors. Ask them if they feel comfortable with an in-person meeting or schedule a virtual coffee. The purpose is to learn why they give, which could be turned into an on-line campaign (see #4) or a profile piece in the newsletter.
  3. Single out long-term donors (designating them as Champions/Advocates or some other named distinction) at your next event with an inexpensive pin and recognition from the stage. Be sure to let this group know in advance they will be recognized.
  4. Create an on-line campaign to profile donors weekly or twice monthly. Have a quick interview on why they support the organization (and consider short videos as an option).

 

Nonprofits that don’t have a Development Director sometimes think that a donor interaction is speaking with a donor at a program or seeing someone at a program and waving to them across a room. Yes, you should note in your database all donor (and nondonor) participation in your programs.

But more importantly, seek out regular attendees and those you suspect may have special interest in your work for more personal attention when you chat about their interests in your work and what’s on tap going forward. These are the interactions that lead to larger gifts.


Reevaluate your year-end campaign and get the details right

As we swing into year-end campaign season, be sure not to stick with "same-old same-old."

Capacity Partners engineered a hugely successful end-of-year campaign for a food pantry in the Dc area several years ago by restructuring their approach and attending to important details. The result was double what the organization had raised the prior year.

Here are some keys:

Segment your donor list. Use tools like wealth screening, giving history, and personal knowledge to structure your approach. For this campaign, the categories were:

  • Visionary, meaning major donors ($1,000+), who were asked to make a larger contribution;
  • Monthly Ask, donors who gave more than once annually but were unpredictable, who were asked to become monthly contributors;
  • Additional Gift, donors who already made an annual contribution and were asked to make an additional gift; and
  • Lapsed donors, who had not given in more than a year and were asked t once again support the organization.

Tailor your communications and try to keep it personal so you stand out in a crowd. The organization sent a different letter for each segment. The executive director hand-signed each one. The letters were hand-stamped with first-class postage.

Don't be afraid to increase the frequency of your solicitations. People are busy especially during the holidays. Getting a reminder about your organization's campaign may be just the nudge they need to commit. Send at least three communications between the week before Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve.

Use multiple platforms (email, social media, website content, mailed hard-copy letter) to advance your campaign, but be sure they all deploy a consistent look that emphasizes the theme and message at the heart of your year-end campaign. For example, the successful campaign designed by Capacity Partners was built around brief, emotional testimonials.

Remember that you've got lots of suupporters out there who care about what you do. Don't let the woes of the economy or the late date slow you down. Get going! You are needed.


Crafting Intimate, Mission-Driven Events

Some organizations are consciously moving away from the classic big gala fundraising event, embracing smaller events to expand supporters’ understanding of their core mission. While organizations still raise funds, these events have a more important goal: building a deeper connection with current donors through experiences that are interactive, intimate, enlightening, and fun. The events also can introduce new donors to the organizations, expanding the circle of support.

Capacity Partners’ client Montgomery Coalition for Adult English Literacy (MCAEL) in Rockville, MD, provides learning opportunities for multi-lingual adults for whom English is not their first language. MCAEL’s annual Adult Spelling Bee is a perfect vehicle to generate better understanding of the organization’s mission.

A Farm Less Ordinary (AFLO) provides employment, training, and a welcoming community to people ages 15-62 with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). AFLO’s Feast in the Field is a multi-course dinner at one of AFLO’s locations. It provides a chance for supporters to meet the Growers (those employed by AFLO) and see the experience they are getting up close.

Capacity Partners Consultant Laura Cohen Apelbaum says, “There is a feeling of community and family. It is personal and hands-on.”

A Window into Challenges

MCAEL’s Adult Spelling Bee format “showcases the difficulties of the English language,” says Executive Director Kathy Stevens. Supporters get a clear window into the challenges faced by the thousands of people who benefit from MCAEL’s programming every day. MCAEL programs help adults learn a new language to support any and all of their life goals, including employment, education, speaking with a doctor, and helping children with schoolwork.

The Bee will be in its 7th year in 2023 (there was a COVID hiatus). Various bells and whistles have been added and subtracted over the years. In its current form, there are celebrity judges as well as contestant teams from the ranks of the Montgomery County, MD, business, nonprofit, and political communities.

The teams compete in a traditional, sometimes raucous, spelling bee in front of an audience of people who have purchased tickets. Businesses and individuals also can get involved via a range of sponsorship opportunities, including by sponsoring specific letters (in honor of someone if desired).

Spot On for Mission

Stevens says a key to success is keeping the event “very accessible and participatory,” including a new audience participation activity involving Twitter, which was introduced in the past few years. Audience members can try their hand at spelling a word that is given orally – the first person to spell it correctly with the right hashtag on the Twitter feed wins a prize.

She notes MCAEL plans to continue with the Bee while making adjustments. At some point down the road, the organization will assess if the event has run its natural course. For now, the Bee “continues to be spot on in terms of our mission.”

* * *

The name says it all: A Farm Less Ordinary (AFLO), in Loudoun County, VA, is not your average farm. Founders Greg Masucci and his wife Maya Wechsler, self-described former city dwellers, have always been committed to finding meaningful work for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), Masucci says.

Several years ago, they realized there was an absence of programs to help people like their son, who has autism gain job experience in a meaningful way as they grew into adulthood, as well as very few opportunities for social interaction. They created AFLO to address these gaps.

The organization’s mission is to provide employment, training, and a welcoming community. The organization employs about 25 people ages 15 to 62 with ID/DD, who are known as “Growers.” The program cultivates a sense of self-worth and independence for the Growers through a basic job skills training program, and through employment itself.

“We kill a lot of birds with one stone,” says Masucci: providing Growers with income, pride, and the opportunity to work; providing caregivers with some respite; and growing great produce that is donated to local food pantries and distributed through a local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program.

In June, AFLO wrapped up its third annual Feast in the Field fundraiser, an evening farm-to-table gourmet meal served at AFLO’s farm in Leesburg, VA (a second farm site is in Lovettsville, VA). Every bit of the event is aimed at sharing an intimate AFLO experience with supporters. This includes keeping attendance to 100 – 125 people. Attendees can bring guests to introduce them to AFLO, which has expanded the organization’s support.

Much of the produce served at the meal was grown at the farm. Before the meal begins, Growers give small groups of attendees tours of the fields and other parts of the facility. These give guests a chance to interact with the people AFLO serves while getting a sense of the pride AFLO’s Growers take in their meaningful work on the farm.

Capacity Partners Consultant Laura Cohen Apelbaum notes, “It’s not a ballroom.” Having the event on-site “is the best way to showcase the mission.”

‘A Gala Doesn’t Connect’

Masucci echoes that. “A gala doesn’t connect to what we are doing.” The on-site feast gives supporters a much greater understanding of the many goals of the organization. There is something therapeutic and rejuvenating about getting your hands in the dirt, he observes. Being on-site helps supporters understand that the work done at the farm by the Growers is a viable therapy model.

He also notes that people like to feel they are supporting something essential, adding, “Where would we be without farming?”

***

Here are six lessons from nonprofits who have created successful small events.


Keeping up with the dreaded economic news? Nonprofit executive directors are evaluating organizational stamina:  Are we in a recession? Will my donor base remain strong? Will it be like COVID? Anything close to the Great Recession? How do I keep the contributions coming in? How do I take care of my team? Or will it blow over before we even know it’s happened?

Questions can keep us up all hours of the night, but “keeping up” means being ready. In my long gray-headed life, I have weathered 10 recessions. Though none of them were fun (well, the first one, I was an infant, so it may have been fun), recessions are an inevitable fact of economic life. They don’t get easier. But they do become more manageable to those who are experienced in navigating their organization through the turbulence.

What are we hearing now —

  • At last report, inflation hit 9.1% — definitely a tough situation.
  • Fed Chair Jerome Powell on prospects of a soft landing: “There’s a path for us to get there. It’s just not getting easier. It’s getting tougher” as reported by AP June 16.
  • White House economic advisor Brian Deese, asked about recession: “There are always risks” as reported by Fortune May 22.
  • Bruce Kasman, chief economist for JP Morgan Chase & Co.: “I’ve been more pessimistic about the opportunity of stabilizing inflation at an acceptable level without a recession” as reported by Bloomberg June 12.

Essentially, a majority of economic leaders (and those who are not political appointees) think we are either IN a recession now or WILL BE in a few months/quarters. Nonprofit leaders know from experience that whether it is a formal recession or simply an economic downturn, their costs are going up, their contributions will likely take a hit, their razor-thin margins will get thinner, and their staff will be worried.

When you’re ready —

I include this out clause for any of you who may NOT be ready. It means that our industry, the nonprofit sector, has a habit of reactionary leadership in turbulent economic times. We’re great at serving those in need, making a difference in our sphere, and inspiring our teams and boards. But our front headwinds tend not to be economic but rather programmatic and institutional. We tend to notice later that revenues are down.

Recessions affect organizations in many and varied ways. Those relying on government grants may not see a negative impact for a year or two. Those with major individual gifts may see immediate declines since gifts are often tied to a donor’s stock portfolio. Those of you in community services may wonder if you will ever see a decline in demand, while those in the arts have learned to watch the economy closely. (Our team at Capacity Partners represents all these sectors, and we see the varied impacts. Plus, we do leadership coaching!)

The point here: Be Ready. There really is no out clause for a drop in contributions.

Four Strategies You Should Work Right Now

1.) Communicate more. All of your stakeholders should know that you are paying attention to the economic uncertainty affecting your service sector and your contributions. Your beneficiaries need to know that you are there for them. Your community should be aware of your forefront position in serving them. Your donors need to know that you appreciate them. And need them. Your board needs to know that you are proactively looking – and counting on their help – toward new and pledged resources.

According to Network for Good, “Ten Strategies for Recession Fundraising,” strategy #6 is “Identify Plans B, C and D: Consider subletting a section of your current office to another nonprofit. Do you have equipment that could be sold? Develop a cause-marketing partnership with a company.”

2.) Revise your cost structure. Yes, you can! Everyone thinks their budgets are made of concrete, that their expenses are set, that there is no wiggle. You can be creative. So says Praveen Kishorepuria, Managing Director, Zero-Based Transformation, Accenture North America:  “Zero-based cost transformation offers multiple options for increased flexibility….many tactical, repeatable activities can be virtualized or outsourced.”  The strategy is to find partners, outsource when possible, use board member companies to provide bridge services, delay hiring….anything to reduce the expense line can dramatically (even if temporarily) improve the bottom line. And if you are worried that you are susceptible to a downturn, you should consider a dramatic 20/20 strategy, explained below.

3.) Get closer to your donors. This is the most important strategy for protecting contributions. Donor retention during a downturn is the surest measure of whether you will survive a recession intact. If you are already close to your Top 10%, then get close to your Top 25%. Imagine being on the bubble of a donor’s portfolio. If you are not among their top philanthropic priorities, you will likely be dropped from their giving program if their income is negatively impacted. Clarifying: when the donor’s ability to contribute is constricted, you will be cut. Unless you are among their top beneficiaries.

Staying close to your top donors, listening to their interests, providing worthwhile recognition, and affirming impact all will result in secure donor retention. Many nonprofits are funded at 80% by their top 20% of donors. Try to ensure that you are among their top beneficiary organizations.

4.) Work with your senior team to develop a dramatic 20/20 program. It’s simple; it brings your leadership together; it works. And it is nearly impossible to do. All you have to do is reduce your expenses by 20% and increase your revenues by 20%. Done! Except that it is excruciatingly difficult.

In a normal economy, it is not unusual to experience a decline in revenue. We manage through those experiences by cutting our costs in the 3rd and 4th quarters and squeezing our board for end-of-year giving. In a recession, you could lose a large percentage of your revenue, 10% or more, maybe 20%. You should always have a plan for cutting 20% of your expenses. Unfortunately for most, it means cutting our most important resource, our people. If you start now, and for most of you entering a new fiscal year, now is the RIGHT time to start, you can figure out how to disperse duties, what operational shortcuts you can enact, what professional services you can delay…all before the contents of your anxiety hit the fan.

But that is only the start. What if you lose revenues by 20% but you ALSO have a plan for raising an additional 20% by the end of FY23. This is difficult but not impossible.

The questions that will lead to increased revenue are:

  • What grants have I not applied for that will allow for administrative infrastructure?
  • What companies are my major individual donors aligned with and with whom I could get a meeting?
  • Which of those companies offer a matching gift program?
  • What companies could provide a corporate sponsorship that I haven’t contacted, and what benefits would attract them that we could produce?
  • Who among my board is well-connected and could broker three prospect meetings in the next three months?
  • What additional service sectors could I explore that might attract a significant new source of revenue?
  • What members of my senior team could I enlist to help raise additional money?
  • Can my finance and marketing teams come together to devise a trackable and concise plan that we can all rally around?
  • How should I plan for a recognition event at the end of the 3rd quarter to thank those who are helping out and to inspire those to give by the end of the year?

These and other questions will lead you to an ambitious and challenging plan to get you to 120% of your budgeted revenue. Whether you lose significant current donors becomes hedged by the new revenue development you have just created.

A 20/20 plan is very difficult. But it is achievable, and if you start now, at the beginning of a fiscal year, it is not out of the question that you can emerge through a recession in a new position of strength.

Recessions Aren’t All Bad

Imagine post-recession that your organization has emerged stronger. You may have fewer staff members, but they are effective and productive. Your leadership team has experienced the come-from-behind success story that they embody to your stakeholders. You have weathered the turbulent conditions and come through them more focused and more capable than before.

You may have attracted new long-term investors in the organization. “Recessions aren’t disastrous for nonprofits. During typical recessions since the 1950s, giving has actually gone up on average, albeit by a modest 0.3 percent a year,” says Patrick Rooney, an economist at Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.” (from Ben Gose, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, January 7, 2020)

A Few Final Thoughts

A diverse, cross-funded organization is the safest during periods of economic uncertainty. Nonprofits that are heavily reliant on government funding, or those with a mostly corporate donor base, are the most vulnerable. Create a comprehensive development plan that is represented by stable and varied sources.

Speed is king. The sooner you implement solid, consensus-developed and well-communicated strategies, the more likely you are to weather the recession when (okay… if) it comes.

Finally, remember that people – your people – are the most important asset you have. Recessions come and go (and come back), but how you handle those around you will reflect your values and integrity for years into the future. Treating your team with respect will last a lifetime.

Resources from The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Eight Steps for Managing Through Tough Times,” Bridgespan

Tips to Navigate Financial Crisis,” Nonprofit Finance Fund

Hard Times, Hard Decisions: 7 Things Small and Midsize Charities Should Do When a Recession Looms,” Chronicle of Philanthropy

philanthropy.com/learn

Attending to Retention

While the worst impacts of the pandemic may be subsiding, the so-called Great Resignation seems to be going strong. Nonprofits are feeling this at least as much as any other employer. Your people are your greatest asset in delivering on the promise of your organization. How can you keep them?

For many nonprofits, retention via better compensation is not an option. One key may be to better connect the mission of your organization to the people who work there. Working for a nonprofit often is a choice partially motivated by an individual’s identification with what your organization stands for and accomplishes. If you can’t pay people more, aim to build a culture that makes it easy for them to take personal pride in the work and your value proposition because they are part of something that is making a social impact.

Building culture and connection have become even more important with many workplaces operating in hybrid on-site/remote fashion permanently, naturally heightening a sense of disconnection.

Here are some tactics to strengthen your organizational connective tissue:

COLLABORATE

The hybrid workplace for many organizations is here to stay. This brings with it a natural tension – and potential resentment – regarding being in the office setting. But this also can be leveraged as an asset. Consider being intentional in terms of expectations about when your team must be in the office, so that those times primarily are dedicated to collaboration that works best in person.

Collaboration certainly is possible via Zoom. But different dynamics are in play when people are together in person which can spark deeper interactions. Rather than requiring someone to go into the office mostly for the sake of showing up to sit at a desk, make sure that those in-person times for your team are planful and include productive collaborative time together to exchange ideas and move projects forward.

Collaboration also is stronger through inclusion. A Capacity Partners client who is in the middle of a strategic planning exercise realized the pandemic and hybrid work environment produced a morale issue: those required to come into the office felt it was an unreasonable obligation to fill in for those who are working from home. The Executive Director decided to involve all the senior staff in the strategic planning process, who then in turn involved the rest of the staff. What began as a discovery of low morale actually became a strategy for inclusive collaboration. Together, they realized there is much work to be done in order to build a positive, forward-reaching organization. The outlook brightened for a renewed, transformed organization.

COMMUNICATE

Are changes coming up in your organization? Make sure those are communicated early and well. You want to give your team the sense that changes are happening with and perhaps even because of them (see previous bullet point on inclusive collaboration), rather than happening to them.

ELEVATE

Your team can help tell your organization’s story. In addition to validating their work, you will be emphasizing their importance in delivering on your organization’s mission. Consider featuring staff members and their mission-driven successes in fundraising pieces and general communications (social media, newsletters, short video interviews shared on social platforms).

ACKNOWLEDGE

The documented reality is that different generations view work and their relationship with it very differently. Recognize that a one-approach-fits-all is unlikely to satisfy a workforce that is diverse in terms of age, and adapt. Here are some ideas from LinkedIn on tailored approaches for Millennial employees. Acknowledgment also means recognizing people are dealing with many types of stress that can affect their commitment level and productivity. Show your colleagues your humanity by checking in with empathy and grace. During the pandemic, an Executive Director of one of the organizations that CP serves became a father. He readily acknowledged how his new role in the family dramatically transformed his ability to show empathy for his staff’s personal lives and commitments.

CP Vice President Michael Feinstein led a large nonprofit organization in the Washington, DC, area for more than a decade. When COVID hit and remote work became the norm, “I changed the cadence of my one-on-one, team, and staff meetings to check in more frequently and focus on how they were feeling in addition to what they were doing.” He notes that a key to being available to others “was managing my own stress, which meant regular exercise for me.”

EMPOWER

If you’ve hired the right people, give them the freedom to do their jobs. Let them know they have your trust to get the job done even when they aren’t sitting in the same place you are.

BUILD CONNECTION

In a hybrid environment, managers must be far more intentional about creating a sense of connection and belonging. Tactics can be simple but meaningful, such as every Monday morning sending out a message to your team asking how their weekend went and sharing a bit about yours. Intrusive? Perhaps. But people can share as much or as little as they like, and it will help them connect with each other too, especially at a time when they may no longer be bumping into each other in the breakroom. Make it easier for them to feel like they belong to a team.


We welcome new VP Michael Feinstein

I am delighted to announce that Michael Feinstein has joined CP as Vice President. He will make our very strong team even stronger. I’m particularly thrilled because Michael’s expertise in both the nonprofit and commercial worlds will deepen our capabilities in serving small and large nonprofits, both locally and nationally. He brings a business mindset to mission-driven organizations. His wealth of experience in strategic planning and board governance will strengthen the services CP has to offer. I also am excited he will be introducing business planning services to meet the varied needs of our clients. On a personal level, I have known Michael for a decade and have been mightily impressed by his creativity and leadership at Bender JCC. We are very lucky he is bringing his talents to CP as we mark 20 years of providing full-service consulting to nonprofits.

You can learn more about Michael here.


Next Steps for NextStop Theatre Company

As Covid-19 crashed into our area a year ago, the arts faced unique challenges as stages went dark and classes moved to virtual platforms. Professional theaters, such as the NextStop Theatre Company in Herndon, Va,, were thrust into unfamiliar, unprecedented circumstances. Not every arts organization survived, let alone thrived, but NextStop Theatre Company, working with Capacity Partners consultants Amy Selco and Stephanie Hanson, reached for … and attained … a new level of strength and stability over the past year. A capacity-building grant from ARTSFAIRFAX brought Capacity Partners and NextStop together.

When the pandemic rocked our economy to its very foundations, NextStop Theatre hesitated to fundraise because they believed their community’s need for food, shelter, and other basic necessities ought to be Northern Virginia’s top charitable priority. Evan Hoffmann, NextStop’s Producing Artistic Director, said, “Our roots grow deep in our community, so before we asked for funds – even though we believe the arts are essential for our souls -- we made sure that our neighbors were getting their basic sustenance needs met first.”

Capacity Partners Consultant Amy Selco adds, “In June, the board recommended the launch of the NextStop Now Fund with an audacious goal of raising $100,000 in just six months to ensure their theater and its invaluable programs would make it through to the other side of the pandemic.”

Working with Capacity Partners, NextStop didn’t simply raise funds; it changed its culture. “NextStop did the difficult work, especially since all the work happened in a virtual space, to move from a transactional fundraising culture to one that embraced philanthropy as a core value,” said Capacity Partners consultant Stephanie Hanson.

With the change of culture and the smart implementation of development strategy and tactics, NextStop Theatre has come within inches of making its long-shot goal of raising $100,000, added four new board members, and made fundraising an expectation of all board members.

“NextStop Theatre is a vital part of our community, and because of the generosity of our board members and hundreds of donors, we are here today and will be here tomorrow, producing theatrical performances and educational programs that are uniquely ambitious, intimate, and accessible both in and for the Northern Virginia community,” said Evan Hoffman with a determined smile. “The insight and wise advice from Capacity Partners, the fierce determination of our excellent board and staff, and the much-appreciated support from the community merged through our incredibly successful NextStop Now campaign to ensure the arts will continue to be a treasured pillar in Northern Virginia.”


How Coaching Can Make You a More Intuitive Leader and a More Creative Innovator

If someone offered you a magic elixir that would increase productivity, improve communications, deepen staff commitment, decrease stress, develop a culture of trust, prevent burnout, better manage risk, and leverage your personal power, wouldn’t you buy it?

Leadership coaching is that elixir, and contrary to what many may believe, it’s not only for those who aren’t performing as well as might be expected; it’s also for those who want to take their leadership from very good to extraordinary or for those who are experiencing significant challenges (like running a nonprofit during a pandemic and recession.)

A national nonprofit leader recently worked with one of Capacity Partners’ leadership coaches, Louise Stoner Crawford, and said, “I feel like a better person as a result of my coaching experience….the positive changes are showing up in all of my relationships in my life….work, family, and friends.  This speaks to the transformative power of coaching and the dramatic effect that this can have on individuals and our communities.”

Coaching can develop those leadership qualities that have been empirically proven to be associated with success. These include: cognitive capacity, social capacities, personality style, motivation, knowledge. Focused on the future, not the past, the right leadership coach can enhance performance, build confidence, and help tackle difficult problems.

One leader Jeanine Cogan worked with for years said, "Leadership coaching is a wonderful source of support for me - smart, wise, and compassionate. I had obstacles that were getting in the way of my success. Jeanine helped me identify, understand, and address those obstacles so I could get out of my own way."

Here’s what the experts who study leadership coaching say:

  • Coaching dramatically improves working relationships, resulting in a 5:1 return on investment.
  • Return on training that is paired with coaching can be productivity increases of up to 88% – four times the increase without coaching.
  • When a leader is unsuccessful and derails from their position, it typically costs an organization 150% of salary. This figure is in addition to productivity loss and team disruption.

How does leadership coaching work? Through one-to-one conversations – conversations that can happen remotely in this era of Covid – a leadership coach will help you or your key staff members move past an impasse, learn new skills, and work through communication challenges. Leadership coaches are not therapists; they are sounding boards, guides, and problem-solvers.

But leadership coaching isn’t for everyone. It works best when someone has a genuine desire to learn and grow. People who tend to blame others for their failures or act as victims rarely benefit from leadership coaching

 Of course, a good fit is essential; the ineffable chemistry between two people must be right to build the trust required for optimal results. You don’t want just any leadership coach – you want an experienced, savvy, personable coach whose only focus is meeting your goals.

Capacity Partners has two outstanding coaches – Louise Stoner Crawford and Jeanine Cogan – who are ready to help you, your key staff, and your board members meet the unique challenges of leading a nonprofit organization in 2020.  Want to learn more? Louise and Jeanine would be delighted to chat with you. Simply email them at louise@capacitypartners.com and jeanine@capacitypartners.com.